Photography Tutorials and Articles

Rule Of Thirds

Rule Of Thirds can make the picture more Dynamic

Like all Visual Arts, there are many rules in photography for composition, and I believe that Rule Of Thirds is one of the most powerful one. These rules are often flexible, which means you can apply, modify, or even break them. It is always suggested to learn these rules and modify or break them to create your envisioned picture.

Rule of thirds is one of those rules which, most of the time, separate a novice from a seasoned photographer. An experienced photographer know when and how to modify or break the rule of thirds, whereas a newbie always sets the subject in the centre of the image.

In this article, I am going to show some example of common Rule Of thirds mistakes.

Centre or Off Centre – Rule Of Thirds

First let’s see what is Rule of thirds. Wikipedia describe it as : “ The rule of thirds is a “rule of thumb” or guideline which applies to the process of composing visual images such as designs, films, paintings, and photographs. The guideline proposes that an image should be imagined as divided into nine equal parts by two equally spaced horizontal lines and two equally spaced vertical lines, and that important compositional elements should be placed along these lines or their intersections. Proponents of the technique claim that aligning a subject with these points creates more tension, energy and interest in the composition than simply cantering the subject.

The below photographs demonstrate the application of the rule of thirds.

Horizon On Centre

In this photo the horizon is set on the centre. Very static image.
In this photo the horizon is set on the centre. Very static image.

Horizon On Rule Of Thirds

Just by setting the horizon to rule of thirds, the image turns to be more dynamic
Just by setting the horizon to rule of thirds, the image turns to be more dynamic

Comparison 

In the following examples I show photos which I applied the rule or broke it. You would notice that the Rule of Thirds makes the photos more pleasing.

Subject right at the centre
Subject right at the centre
Off Centre subject is more pleasing
Off Centre subject is more pleasing
Centre and static
Centre and static
Off centre and going out of the frame. I modified the rule here to show that the subject is going away.
Off centre and going out of the frame. I modified the rule here to show that the subject is going away.
In portrait subject in the centre take away the beauty of the composition
In portrait subject in the centre take away the beauty of the composition
By setting the subject off centre, you add more to your portraiture story
By setting the subject off centre, you add more to your portraiture story
By having the subject in the centre, the viewers stop at the centre and won't look at the other part of the image
By having the subject in the centre, the viewers stop at the centre and won't look at the other part of the image

That is all for now. As always feel free to contact us if you have any questions. Follow us on Facebook, Instagram and Twitter for more Free Tutorials.

Ted and the Omnilargess Team

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