Posts Tagged 'camera class for chilliwack'

Outdoor Photography Class

Outdoor Photography Techniques Fall Edition

Autumn is all about crisp fresh air and amazing colours. Photographers love Fall when mother nature beckons to us with the beauty of landscape. As with other types of photography, there are some fine techniques and tricks involved in great outdoor photography.

The Fall Outdoor Photography Class was developed to equip you with these techniques and tips. This is a full day outdoor photography workshop, where you learn how to set your camera for a variety of light conditions using different metering modes and exposure settings to maximize your chance of capturing beautiful pictures.

Outdoor Photography Techniques is for beginners to intermediate photographers. All camera and makes are welcome in this class.

Now let’s take a look at one of the outdoor photography techniques. It is called SIMPLICITY. In the picture below I walked around the tree to find a more simple background for the leaves to show.

Outdoor photography class

Simplicity is one the major rules of composition.

You notice the colour and texture of the leaves, and nothing in the background distracts you from the beauty of the leaves.

We are going to have more of these Photography Techniques in our workshop and plenty of opportunity to practice them. Check our Upcoming Classes  for more information and as always feel free to contact us if you have any questions. That’s all for now. Stay tuned for more photography tips!

Ted and the Omnilargess Team

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Event Venue Date
Beginners Photography Bootcamp High Street Office
  • February 2, 2023 6:00 pm
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Vancouver Skyline at Night Totem Poles at Brockton Point
  • February 18, 2023 5:00 pm
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TOFINO BC PHOTO TOUR Tofino, BC
  • February 24, 2023 4:00 pm
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Landscape Photography Workshop Maple Ridge Dyke
  • April 1, 2023 8:00 am
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Nitobe Garden Photo Walk Nitobe Garden
  • April 22, 2023 10:00 am
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Digital Camera Crash Course 2023 High Street Office
  • April 29, 2023 9:30 am
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LAC DU BOIS PHOTO TOUR Lac du Bois, British Columbia
  • May 5, 2023 4:00 pm
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LEARN PORTRAIT PHOTOGRAPHY High Street Office
  • June 15, 2023 6:00 pm
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Chasing Shadows High Street Office
  • June 17, 2023 9:00 am
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Youth Summer Photography Program High Street Office
  • July 12, 2023 2:00 pm
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Beginners Digital Camera Class

Beginners Digital Camera Class

Unleash the power of your digital Camera

Beginners Digital Camera class is a two part workshop and you learn about your camera settings and controls. Each part is Two hours with theory and hands on.
In this four hour class you will explore the hidden functions of your Digital camera and learn about Shutter speed, Aperture, ISO, White Balance, and more. This workshop is primarily intended for photographers using digital SLR cameras, but many Manual capable digital compact cameras are also suitable. Each participant is expected to bring a digital camera with a fully charged battery and memory card(s)

Beginners digital camera class

Exposure and composition are the most important elements in photography. Photo credit to Katie

Part one Classroom session on Saturday December 3rd 2016 from 10:00 am to 12:00 pm

In this 2 hour session you will learn the Digital camera’s terminology, Menu, Functionality such as: Shutter Speed, Aperture Value, ISO, White Balance, and much more.

Part two Hands on and practical session on Saturday December 3rd from 1:00pm to 3:00 pm

This session is fully hands on and you practice with different settings such as , Auto Focusing, Lens Focal Length, Hidden functions, and much more. You will explore the differences in file format and tips on how to make better images using your creativity.

This workshop is developed for beginners and we will cover all the important functions of your camera. Please bring your camera, fully charged battery, and Memory card. We are going to try and test almost all the different settings and scenarios that the average person would encounter when taking photos. After taking this photography class you won’t use the AUTO mode any more and you will see significant improvement in your daily photography.

Check our UPCOMING CLASSES for more fun workshops.

Ted and the Omnilargess Team

Search:

Event Venue Date
Beginners Photography Bootcamp High Street Office
  • February 2, 2023 6:00 pm
Register
Vancouver Skyline at Night Totem Poles at Brockton Point
  • February 18, 2023 5:00 pm
Register
TOFINO BC PHOTO TOUR Tofino, BC
  • February 24, 2023 4:00 pm
Register
Landscape Photography Workshop Maple Ridge Dyke
  • April 1, 2023 8:00 am
Register
Nitobe Garden Photo Walk Nitobe Garden
  • April 22, 2023 10:00 am
Register
Digital Camera Crash Course 2023 High Street Office
  • April 29, 2023 9:30 am
Register
LAC DU BOIS PHOTO TOUR Lac du Bois, British Columbia
  • May 5, 2023 4:00 pm
Register
LEARN PORTRAIT PHOTOGRAPHY High Street Office
  • June 15, 2023 6:00 pm
Register
Chasing Shadows High Street Office
  • June 17, 2023 9:00 am
Register
Youth Summer Photography Program High Street Office
  • July 12, 2023 2:00 pm
Register
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Photography Composition Rules

Photography Composition Rules

Breaking Composition Rules: Bad or Good? 

Photography composition rules are a tool to understand the basic principles of design in visual arts. These composition rules are constructive to make an image more dynamic and pleasing. However, there are also times you need to break these composition rules to create a better story with your pictures. I cover more about Photography Composition Rules in Digital Camera Bootcamp workshop.  Please check the course description for more info.

Last week I posted this photo in Rebel Photographers Facebook Group and asked the group: What rules did I break in this picture and WHY.

Composition Rules

Breaking Composition Rules, Bad or Good?

Everyone answered the question correctly about the broken rule, which is the Rule of Thirds, and almost everyone got my point of breaking the rule, but not the reason. In this blog post, I’m going to explain the reason why.

What is the Rule of Thirds?

In photography (and all the visual arts), the Rule of Thirds is a composition technique that divides the “canvas” into three sections, both vertically and horizontally. It suggests we compose with the main subject off centre (on one of the intersecting lines) for a more dynamic image.

What is the reason for Rule Of Thirds?

The main reason is to invite your viewers to see the whole image. By looking at the main subject positioned off centre, our eyes will scan the entire picture. This scanning makes the photo more interesting because people will view the full scene, not just part of it.

With this explanation of the basics of the Rule of Thirds, it will be easier for you to understand the answer to why I broke the rule in the above picture. With so many distracting elements in the scene, I wanted you to focus on him only and see how he was engaged with whatever he had in his hands. Because I centred him in my composition, almost everyone paid attention to what I wanted to say! Mission accomplished!

Conclusion:

Photography composition rules help us to tell our stories more effectively. It is essential to learn these rules and understand the reasons behind them. Composition rules help us to become skilled at knowing when we need to break them to tell the story more efficiently.

So next time, when you want to block your audiences from noticing any distractive elements in the scene, place your subject in the centre.

That is all for now. Check our upcoming classes for a photography workshop that you’d love to take. Let me know if you have more ideas like this one to share. As always, I love to hear from you.

Ted and the Omnilargess Team

Do you want to take better pictures?

We offer many fun and hands-on photography classes. All of our photography programs consist of practical and up to date skills. Therefore, you learn the latest techniques in a friendly environment; and since the class size is small, there is plenty of time for exercising.

Digital Camera Crash Course is one of our most popular photography courses. This two-week program is in four sessions, and each session consists of theories and hands-on practices.

Our next Digital Camera Crash Course starts on September 26th, 2020. There are only a few spots left.

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Search:

Event Venue Date
Beginners Photography Bootcamp High Street Office
  • February 2, 2023 6:00 pm
Register
Vancouver Skyline at Night Totem Poles at Brockton Point
  • February 18, 2023 5:00 pm
Register
TOFINO BC PHOTO TOUR Tofino, BC
  • February 24, 2023 4:00 pm
Register
Landscape Photography Workshop Maple Ridge Dyke
  • April 1, 2023 8:00 am
Register
Nitobe Garden Photo Walk Nitobe Garden
  • April 22, 2023 10:00 am
Register
Digital Camera Crash Course 2023 High Street Office
  • April 29, 2023 9:30 am
Register
LAC DU BOIS PHOTO TOUR Lac du Bois, British Columbia
  • May 5, 2023 4:00 pm
Register
LEARN PORTRAIT PHOTOGRAPHY High Street Office
  • June 15, 2023 6:00 pm
Register
Chasing Shadows High Street Office
  • June 17, 2023 9:00 am
Register
Youth Summer Photography Program High Street Office
  • July 12, 2023 2:00 pm
Register

That is all for now. Stay tuned for my next photography Tips. We love to hear from you. Let us know if you have any questions, feel free to send us your questions, and we will be more than happy to answer them. Follow us on Facebook, Instagram and Twitter for more Free Tutorials and Tips.

Ted and the Omnilargess Team

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The Best Camera Ever

The Great Camera Debate Part 3

Let’s find the best camera 

In the Great Camera Debate Part 1 and Part 2, I categorized cameras into two main groups:

A) Point and Shoot cameras

B) Cameras with interchangeable lenses.

I also divided category B cameras into three subcategories:

1) Entry Level cameras

2) Prosumer cameras,

3) Pro cameras

And once again, here is the question which is so often asked and discussed in great detail:

Which is the best camera?

This question is actually not much help at all, because there are many types of photography and the subjects I shoot most often may be different from what you do. So the right question is:

What camera do I need to buy or upgrade to?

Now we are on the right track! I can read as many reviews on cameras as I can find, but at the end of the day my specific needs in photography are the best guide to which camera would be best suited for my uses. So read on for my thoughts on the different scenarios typically found in photography and we’ll look at which category and type of camera is better suited than the others. By comparing your shooting requirements with these common scenarios, you will be able to “clear the clutter” and choose a right camera that is right for you.

Scenario 1 (Finding the Best Camera):

You primarily want to be able to capture higher quality photos and you’d like to control the settings of the camera to capture what you have visualized in your mind. You are not planning to shoot low light shots. The size and weight of a camera are more important to you than the accessories, body construction, and weather sealing.

In this scenario, if you know you won’t want to upgrade by adding accessories such as interchangeable lenses, filters, flashes etc., you can choose one of the advanced Point and Shoot cameras. Be sure to check the size of the sensor to make sure that it is larger than a regular point and shoot camera.

The great camera debate

Compact digital camera with lots of controls can be the best camera, if you are looking for compact size, light weight, and controls.

Creative uses of Aperture

Long Depth of field to have more elements in focus. Image captured by a compact digital camera with exposure controls

But what if you want to be able to upgrade lenses, use flash on or off camera, capture low light scenes or try out creative accessories such as filters? If this matches your needs then you’ll want to consider moving up to a DSLR or Mirrorless camera.

The great camera debate

Entry level DSLR. an Entry level digital camera can provide plenty of controls. This type of cameras can be the best camera for you if you want to start digital photography

The entry level cameras in this category provide all of the important settings and controls for your photography needs. You can even use pro lenses on these cameras for better results. Entry level cameras are well suited to photography as a hobby or as an affordable way to find your niche in photography because they are generally less expensive. If you are new to digital photography and know you want some creative control, I suggest you consider an entry level camera and add one or two high quality lenses if you can. Here are some samples taken on entry level cameras by students who’ve participated in my digital camera workshops.

the best camera

Imaged captured by Pentax entry level DSLR by Alice C. after taking our bootcamp workshop.

the best camera

Photos from Bootcamp Field trip.Imaged captured by Pentax entry level DSLR by Sandy B. after taking our bootcamp workshop.

the best camera

Entry level DSLR camera can be the best camera for you when you learn how to control it. Imaged captured by Nikon entry level DSLR by Natalie S. after taking our bootcamp workshop.

As you can see in these photos, even a kit lens can capture high quality images. Please check the clients’ testimonies HERE, to learn how taking the right workshop can make you fall in love with photography.

You will find a complete list of our upcoming classes HERE. I highly recommend our popular Digital Camera Bootcamp starting January 13, 2016. This eight week program gives you some solid basics of understanding your camera, exposure and composition; a Night Photography and a Day field trip are also included in the Digital Camera Bootcamp.

Stay tuned for the next instalment as we continue to explore The Great Camera Debate.

Ted and the Omnilargess Team


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Digital Camera Storage

Digital camera Maintenance Part 3

Digital camera storage and care

Last week we looked at how to clean the Camera Body in Part 1 and Cleaning the Lenses in Part 2. This week I’ll cover some guidelines and suggestions for caring for photography gear and how to store it safely, especially as we head into the cold and damp season. Correct storage of your digital camera equipment is important; electronic gadgets are very fragile in many aspects. There are an abundance of articles on the internet regarding this topic and many are very good, although they can be very long. I’ve outlined the most important topics with links to the original articles for further reading and study if you wish to know more.

Digital Camera Storage Tips:

Nikon put together a very informative and long article regarding digital camera storage. You can find the full article HERE. I narrowed it down to the most common areas of concern.

 Part I – Proper Care and Storage of Equipment Storage

  • When the camera will not be used for an extended period, replace the monitor cover, remove the battery and replace the battery terminal cover to prevent leakage and accidental short circuiting of the terminals.
  • To prevent mould or mildew, store the camera in a dry, well-ventilated area.
  • If you will not be using for long periods, store the camera in a camera case containing a desiccant. (Silica Gel is widely available) It’s recommended to take the camera out of storage once a month, turn the camera on and release the shutter a few times before putting the camera away again.
  • Do not store the camera case in a plastic bag, as this may cause the material to deteriorate. Note that desiccant gradually loses its capacity to absorb moisture and should be replaced (or restored) at regular intervals.
  • Do not store the camera with naphtha or camphor mothballs, or close to equipment that produces strong magnetic fields (such as televisions or computers), in areas subject to extremes of temperature, for example near a space heater or in a closed vehicle on a hot day, or in locations that are poorly ventilated or subject to humidity over 60%. This can result in damage to the sensor or CPU’s internally in the camera or lens.
  • Extreme temperature changes can also cause condensation inside the camera body.  When taking the camera from a very hot place to a very cold place (or cold to hot) place it inside an airtight container such as a plastic bag for awhile to expose the camera gradually to the temperature change.
  • Rechargeable batteries may be stored and recharged later, but all batteries will eventually weaken and no longer hold a charge.  At that time replacement batteries should be used. It’s recommended to always turn off the camera before removing the power source.

Memory cards Maintenance 

  • Format memory cards in the camera before first time use.
  • Turn the power off before inserting or removing memory cards.
  • Do not remove memory cards from the camera, turn the camera off, or remove or disconnect the power source during formatting or while data is being recorded, deleted, or copied to a computer. Failure to observe these precautions could result in loss of data or in damage to the camera or card.
  • Do not touch the card terminals with your fingers or metal objects.
  • Do not apply force to the card casing, or use the memory card for anything other it’s intended purpose. Failure to observe this precaution could damage the card.
  • Do not bend, drop, or subject to strong physical shocks.
  • Do not expose to heat, water, high levels of humidity, or direct sunlight

If you wish to read the full document CLICK HERE.

That’s all for now.  Stay tuned for our next part about additional precautions you should take to keep your digital camera happy. As the saying goes: “Happy camera, happy photographer”!

Ted and the Omnilargess Team

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Beginners Digital Camera Workshop

Beginners Digital Camera workshop 

Our popular Digital Camera workshop for beginners is scheduled for July 15 and there are a few spots still available!  

Do you know almost all digital cameras have some advanced controls to enable you to produce better photos? And yes we cover these controls in our beginners digital camera workshops! Does it sound odd that a beginner’s workshop would explore advanced controls? 

As a matter of fact most of these “advanced settings” are fairly easy to understand and apply, and can make significant improvements in image quality.

One example is the Metering Mode and how a quick change from Matrix/Evaluated metering to Centre Weighted or Spot metering can improve the exposure for your subject.

Different Metering Modes

Different Metering Modes

You may ask “Where do I find the Metering mode in my camera?” and the answer to this (and more questions) can be found in our Beginners Digital Camera Workshop!

Metering Modes for Nikon shooters and Canon shooters examples

Nikon Metering system Menu

Nikon Metering system Menu

Canon Metering system Menu

Canon Metering system Menu

 

On the other hand you may say; “I just want to take nice photos of my family and friends.” We will also explore the special features in your camera which help you create better photos of a wide variety of subjects using controls such as shutter speed, aperture, and ISO.

Or you may ask: “I want to go into photography very seriously and possibly as a business. Is this class a good starting point for me?” For serious students I suggest our 8 week program  (Digital Camera Bootcamp), but if you cannot make the eight week commitment, then Beginners Digital Camera workshop will give you some good solid basics to understanding your camera and exploring the wonderful world of digital photography.

There are only few spots left for this popular digital photography workshop. This workshop is suitable for all digital cameras with some manual controls and is for all ages and levels in photography. It is a 3 hour classroom session with some practical exercises and a three hour hands on field trip We keep the class size small to allow enough time for interacting with your instructor.


Please let us know if you have any questions.  We hope to see you there!

Ted and the Omnilargess Team

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New Digital Camera Bootcamp

Digital Digital Bootcamp for beginners

I want to let you know that our one day Digital Camera for Beginners workshop is sold out. If you are looking for another digital camera workshop for beginner to intermediate levels, I encourage you to check out our very popular Digital Camera Bootcamp for beginners. I recently rescheduled the start of this series of workshops to April, which gives you plenty of time to register for these workshops and make plans to join us.

What are the advantages of enrolling in Digital Camera Bootcamp?

Digital Camera Bootcamp for Beginners is an 8 week program. The classroom sessions will be held in our office location every Wednesday night from 6-9pm. This program is packed with practical exercises, hands on learning and two field trips. Each session includes assignments which help you apply the techniques you learn in classroom sessions to real life applications and solidify the process of learning new techniques.

Slow shutter night time photography part of our Digital Camera Bootcamp

Slow shutter night time photography part of our Digital Camera Bootcamp

Our Bootcamp for Beginners also offers two exciting field trips: one is all about understanding exposure and  composition to create a dynamic image; the second outing is the exciting world of Night time Photography and the instructor will walk you through the techniques of getting great night shots.

Night time Photography by Omnilargess Bootcamp students

Night time Photography by Omnilargess Bootcamp students

Why does Bootcamp for Beginners seem a bit expensive?

In reality it is not expensive at all – in fact it is the best value for your money because the cost of $400 is for eight workshops, which comes to only $50 per workshop!  We wanted to offer a practical and affordable commitment to help get you on a good path to better photography.

Is there a promotion or discount for Digital Camera Bootcamp?

Being part of our student group during the Bootcamp you save 15% on rental fees from our rental department. If there is pro lens, camera body, flash, studio light, etc. that you want to try during the Bootcamp course you can rent them and enjoy 15% saving on our reasonable rental fees.

Tickets are selling fast. Register today to secure your spot in Digital Camera Bootcamp for Beginners.  I look forward to seeing you there!

Ted and the Omnilargess Team


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Manual Exposure

Manual Exposure puts you in the driver’s seat

It’s all about getting perfect shots!

Photo Tip Friday October 10, 2015

Happy Thanksgiving everyone!

I want to start off by saying I am thankful for having such good audiences. Without your enthusiastic desire to learn and grow I couldn’t have made it this far.

For this week’s photo tip I want to discuss why you should take your photography experience to the next level by learning to shoot in manual exposure. In my photography workshops I always ask my students to gradually start shooting manual exposure and not to jump headlong into it. In this article I am going to explain the reason for emphasizing “gradually”!

In Manual Exposure you have more freedom for composition

In Manual Exposure you have more freedom for composition

Let’s take a look at some highlights of the different shooting modes:

Aperture priority A/AV

In this mode you set the aperture and your camera selects the shutter speed to make the correct exposure. It is very important to understand the metering system your camera uses to achieve the correct exposure; for example, shooting conditions where it shines and also where it sometimes fails.

When shooting Manual Exposure, You can select the depth of field by adjusting the Aperture.

When shooting Manual Exposure, You can select the depth of field by adjusting the Aperture.

Shutter priority S/TV

With this setting you select the shutter speed and the camera sets your aperture or f-stop. Same as with Aperture priority you should carefully select the metering mode best suited to your subject and conditions.

It was a windy day and while shooting Manual Exposure, I set my shutter speed higher to avoid the shake of the leaf.

It was a windy day and while shooting Manual Exposure, I set my shutter speed higher to avoid the shake of the leaf.

Manual Exposure

When you shoot in Manual Exposure you control both shutter speed and aperture. At first it seems very complicated but with practice you will get faster and more comfortable shooting in Manual. When you shoot in Manual exposure you refer to the camera’s built in Light meter to determine correct exposure and adjust the shutter speed and aperture as necessary. Once you’ve determined the correct settings you can walk around the scene and capture your pictures without being worried about the exposure provided the light stays the same. It is peace of mind which allows you to focus more on the composition.

When shooting in Manual Exposure you can set the exposure and take photos till the light changes.

When shooting in Manual Exposure you can set the exposure and take photos till the light changes.

Learning how to shoot in manual mode takes patience and practice before it becomes second nature; I strongly encourage you to experiment with shooting in manual with non-critical images where learning and experimentation are the goal.  Have fun with it and before long I’m sure you will be like many photographers who prefer to always shoot in manual exposure mode!

Do you want to learn more about how to shoot in Manual Exposure?

On November 22, 2014, I am leading a workshop about shooting in Manual Exposure. It is going to be very interesting and a great learning experience. This fully hands-on workshop is for everyone who wants to take better pictures and unleash the true power of their camera.

Ted and the Omnilargess Team


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