Posts Tagged 'learn digital Camera Photography Chilliwack'

Set your camera for Fall outdoor photography

Fall Outdoor Photography Class 

Two part workshop for capturing better photos 

Autumn is here with exciting opportunities to photograph the colourful images of fall. Fall is photographers favourite season because of the light, the vibrant colours and being out in the fresh outdoor air. Taking photos outdoors, especially in autumn, needs specific know-how techniques. One of the most important techniques is EXPOSURE. Exposure can be controlled by Shutter Speed, Aperture and ISO. For taking pictures outdoor you also need to know how to select different Exposure metering, such as Spot Vs Centre Vs Matrix/Evaluative.  Fall Outdoor Photography Class is scheduled for November 12 and all camera makes and models are welcome.

This is a five hour workshop in outdoor. You will learn how to set your camera for different light conditions, how to use correct metering mode, and the most important things, how to find the location and compose a photo.

The Fall Outdoor Photography Class is completely HANDS ON. We are going to walk around the field and apply these techniques in practical ways. It is a full five hour outdoor photography adventure with plenty of time to interact with your instructor and learn specific photography tips.

Come to outdoor photography class and learn how to the exposure for capturing outstanding Fall colours

Come to Fall outdoor photography class and learn how to the exposure for capturing outstanding Fall colours

In above picture I used Matrix/Evaluative metering mode to set the exposure for over all scene. Composition is another key factor for creating outstanding images.

Outdoor photography class

Simplicity is one the major rules of composition for outdoor photography techniques

Come and join us for Fall Outdoor Photography Class and learn more about these easy yet powerful techniques. There are only few more spots left. Register today to secure your spot or visit our UPCOMING CLASSE for more amazing workshops.

Ted and the Omnilargess Team


 

 

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Focal Point part 2

Exploring ways to create Focal Point in your picture

In Part 1 we defined focal point and discussed why it is a key ingredient for dynamic eye-catching images. In Part 2 let’s jump right in and take a look at some ways to incorporate focal point for more compelling images.

Isolation

One of the best way to create visual focal points is to isolate your subject. The rain drop in this picture is a great example.

focal points

By using Depth Of Field, you can isolate the main subject from the rest of the scene to have a focal point.

I could have included other rain drops or background elements, but I chose to keep it simple. Nothing else in the image is taking your attention away from the rain drop. It’s completely uncluttered.

It also really helps when your subject is a different colour than the background. In this photo the main subject is completely obvious since its colour is totally different from the background.

Focal point

Differences in colour and contrast can be used to isolate the main subject

Certain backgrounds are easier to work with. A blue sky is a definite go-to for creating focal point because it is a single colour and nothing else.

Focal point

Using sky as a simple background can draw more attention to subject

A dense bush might not be such a good choice because it’s a dark and complicated mix of colours. Whatever you are photographing will need to be very bright and colourful in order for it to stand out against such a background.

focal point

A sample of busy and cluttered background

That is all for now. Stay tuned for more tips as we continue this series on focal point.

Are you eager to learn more? Visit our UPCOMING CLASSES for the full lineup of photography workshops. In the Fall Outdoor Photography Class, a fully hands-on outdoor workshop, you will have plenty of opportunity to practice these tips and more!

Ted and the Omnilargess Team

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Beginners Photography Bootcamp High Street Office
  • February 9, 2023 6:00 pm
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Vancouver Skyline at Night Totem Poles at Brockton Point
  • February 18, 2023 5:00 pm
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Nitobe Garden Photo Walk Nitobe Garden
  • April 22, 2023 10:00 am
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Digital Camera Crash Course 2023 High Street Office
  • April 29, 2023 9:30 am
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Beginners Photography Class, Summer Bootcamp High Street Office
  • May 4, 2023 6:00 pm
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LAC DU BOIS PHOTO TOUR Lac du Bois, British Columbia
  • May 5, 2023 4:00 pm
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Landscape Photography Workshop Maple Ridge Dyke
  • May 13, 2023 8:00 am
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LEARN PORTRAIT PHOTOGRAPHY High Street Office
  • June 15, 2023 6:00 pm
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Chasing Shadows High Street Office
  • June 17, 2023 9:00 am
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Youth Summer Photography Program High Street Office
  • July 12, 2023 2:00 pm
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TOFINO BC PHOTO TOUR Tofino, BC
  • October 20, 2023 4:00 pm
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Camera Orientation Tip

Camera Orientation Tip

Camera Orientation is a simple Landscape Photography Tip that can make your photos awesome!

There are many rules in photography and especially for landscape photography. It is always good to learn these rules and know when to bend or break them as needed. In this article I am going to show you one very simple yet powerful rule called Camera Orientation. In our upcoming Fall Outdoor Photography Class I will discuss more of theses rules and techniques. There are only five more spots left for this workshop. Register today to secure your spot!

Outdoor classes

Fall Outdoor Photography class is all about hands on techniques

What is Camera Orientation?

We can use the camera in Landscape mode (holding camera horizontal) or Portrait mode (holding camera vertical). Each mode has a different effect on our pictures and our subject. In the pictures below it’s easy to see how camera orientation can affect the look of the image.

Camera Orientation

Same subject as blow image and this time I used Landscape mode for Camera Orientation. It is easy to see how it changed the result

Camera Orientation

In this photo I used Portrait Mode. Totally two different photos from the same subject!

How do you select Camera Orientation?

There are several rules for selecting the Camera Orientation. In this article I cover one of the basic ones. It is called Balance. Balance in selecting camera orientation means to understand the theme, texture or main subject of the scene and select camera orientation accordingly. In the picture below almost all the elements in the scene are vertical and I chose Portrait mode.

Fall Images

All the elements in this photo are vertical, so I selected the portrait mode.

In this photo the subject is horizontal, so I selected Landscape mode for camera orientation.

Camera Orientation

The subject is horizontal, so I selected the Landscape mode.

Do you always have to apply the Balance Rule?

Absolutely not. All composition rules are flexible, which means you can bend or even break them to create your own vision. Here is an example. In this setting of vertical elements I chose the landscape orientation to allow me to include more of the scene.

camera Orientation

Breaking the composition Balance rule to create my own vision of covering more of the scene

I will cover more of theses rules in our Fall Outdoor Photography Class. Please visit our Upcoming Classes page for more information. As always stay tuned for more tips on digital photography!

Ted and the Omnilargess Team

Search:

Event Venue Date
Beginners Photography Bootcamp High Street Office
  • February 9, 2023 6:00 pm
Sold Out
Vancouver Skyline at Night Totem Poles at Brockton Point
  • February 18, 2023 5:00 pm
Register
Nitobe Garden Photo Walk Nitobe Garden
  • April 22, 2023 10:00 am
Register
Digital Camera Crash Course 2023 High Street Office
  • April 29, 2023 9:30 am
Register
Beginners Photography Class, Summer Bootcamp High Street Office
  • May 4, 2023 6:00 pm
Register
LAC DU BOIS PHOTO TOUR Lac du Bois, British Columbia
  • May 5, 2023 4:00 pm
Register
Landscape Photography Workshop Maple Ridge Dyke
  • May 13, 2023 8:00 am
Register
LEARN PORTRAIT PHOTOGRAPHY High Street Office
  • June 15, 2023 6:00 pm
Register
Chasing Shadows High Street Office
  • June 17, 2023 9:00 am
Register
Youth Summer Photography Program High Street Office
  • July 12, 2023 2:00 pm
Register
TOFINO BC PHOTO TOUR Tofino, BC
  • October 20, 2023 4:00 pm
Register
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Shooting Manual Outdoor

Shooting Manual Outdoor Workshop

Most pro photographers shoot in manual mode most of the time, but why?

In this article I am going to cover some important benefits of Manual Shooting. If you haven’t tried manual shooting or have tried it and weren’t quite happy with the results, then I have a good news for you. On April 2 from 10:00am to 5:00 pm I am going to have a field trip photography workshop where I will teach how to shoot in manual and get fabulous images. I strongly recommend this workshop to everyone who wants to take their photography skills to the next level. As of today there are only 2 spots left for this workshop. Register today to secure your place.

What are the different exposure modes?

There are four different exposure modes: Auto, Aperture Priority, Shutter Priority, and Manual.

In Auto mode your camera controls pretty much everything and you don’t have any controls. If you use the Program mode you have some controls over camera settings. We call these modes AUTOMATIC MODES. In Aperture Priority you set the Aperture (F stop) and the camera selects the shutter speed for you, and with Shutter Priority you set the shutter speed and the camera controls the aperture for you. These modes are called SEMI AUTOMATIC.

What are the benefits of shooting Manual?

In automatic or semi automatic modes as the brightness of background or foreground changes, the camera changes the exposure, whereas in Manual mode you select the shutter speed and aperture according to the brightness of your subject, essentially locking the exposure to your desire and the camera cannot change it.

Shooting Manual

Automatic or semi automatic modes can not capture what you visualized of the scene

Shooting Manual

While Shooting Manual you can lock the exposure to capture the image that you visualized

What is one example of a useful application?

Everyone likes silhouette pictures and if you want to capture a beautiful silhouette, you need to use manual exposure mode; set the exposure for the bright background, and you are done!

Manual Shooting

Are you interested in Silhouette photos? You need to learn how to shoot in manual exposure

There are many situations when shooting in manual mode can save you time and create better photos. We will cover these in our Manual Shooting in Field workshop on April 2. That is all for now. Check our Upcoming Classes for our exciting lineup of interactive classes in photography and photo editing.


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Capturing Amazing Pictures

Tips for capturing amazing pictures every time! 

The Great Camera Debate Part 7

In the previous article I discussed the importance of a camera lens over a camera body. In this article we are going to look at the importance of education and skills.

Look at these two photos and try to guess what kind of camera and lens were used to capture each of these photos:

Capturing amazing pictures

What kind of camera and lens were used to take this photo?

capturing amazing pictures

It is difficult to tell what camera and lens were used in this photo, is it not?

Please take a moment after you’ve studied the images and make a note of what type of camera you think took these shots. Most likely your guess will be an inexpensive camera or a smart phone. Let’s continue with two more examples for you to evaluate.  I will reveal the camera identities soon!

What type of camera took these images? As before, make a note of your verdict:

Capturing amazing pictures

An example of good pictures. What camera and lens were used here?

capturing amazing pictures

Another example of a well exposed and composed picture

Are you ready for the reveal? Then here we go:

Capturing amazing pictures

As you can see in this screenshot, shockingly this photo was taken by a pro camera and lens! If the exposure is not correct, the type of camera can not help the image quality

Capturing amazing pictures

Just because the exposure is correct, this photo from a smart phone looks amazing!

Great pictures are the result of good composition and correct exposure, regardless of what equipment you use. Our photography workshops are focused on teaching you important skills for getting good exposures and composition. No matter what kind of camera you use, you can make amazing photos when you learn these fundamentals of photography. Our Digital Camera Bootcamp is an 8 week program which covers all the major topics and prepares you for capturing amazing photos. It includes two field trips (one daytime and one night time photography) where you put all the learning to good use and use your camera in a variety of settings and conditions. Here are some photos and testimonies from our previous Digital Camera Bootcamp participants:

  • I took the outdoor photography course last weekend and it was a lot of fun. I learned new tricks I never knew before and how to take better pictures. Thank you for an excellent experience and looking forward to joining more classes.Caroline Cari

  • Manual Shooting

    In Manual shooting the background can not change the exposure

  • Great teaching by Ted and thanks Ed for helping outPat Barnum

  • Capturing amazing pictures

    Composition and exposure are the main keys for amazing photos

  • By the end of the Beginner’s Digital Photography I had a solid understanding of the basic functions of my SLR camera.  It was great to have a live instructor who was able to show me the distinct features of my specific camera and help me troubleshoot when things weren’t quite right.  Ted’s explanations were clear, and the overall experience was a lot of fun!

    –Stephanie

  • Capturing amazing pictures

    Controlling shutter speed allows you create different effects

    Conclusion:

    The camera is a tool and by itself is not responsible for making great photos. When you learn how to use the tool, in this case the camera, it is you who will make outstanding results. I don’t ignore the importance of proper tools, but I want to make it clear that as a photographer your results will become more consistent the more you learn about your camera and photography in general. Omnilargess Photography Workshop is a good place to expand your knowledge, with classes and private lessons for every level and interest.

    That is all for now. Just a quick reminder that we offer Gift Cards for the photographers on your list, so let Santa’s helper know how to find us!

    Ted and the Omnilargess Team

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    Auto White Balance Vs Presets

    Auto White Balance Vs Presets 

    When and how to use White Balance Presets.

    As discussed in the previous article (White Balance in Digital Photography), our digital cameras do not have a brain to adjust for colour cast. Almost all new digital cameras come with Auto White Balance, some sort of Presets and a Custom White Balance setting.

    What is Auto White Balance?

    Each digital camera has the data of thousands of images built into its processor. When you use any of the auto modes (Auto White Balance, Auto Exposure, Auto area auto focus, etc.) the camera compares the scene to the data of these images and selects the one that is closest. The result might be close or be quite far from accurate color and exposure.

    You may have noticed that the newer digital cameras take better photos. It is not because these cameras are better made, but mainly because the manufacturers added more data to the newer camera to use as references!

    When should I use Auto White Balance?

    This being said, if you have a newer digital camera and are taking pictures with only one source of light, the Auto White Balance will create a decent image for you. If there is more than one source of light (e.g. daylight from a window and tungsten light of an indoor lamp) the chances are higher that your camera can’t make the right decision, which will result in a heavy color cast in your image.

    How do digital cameras measure the White Balance?

    Generally speaking, digital camera searches for 18% gray in the scene, and whatever resembles closest to 18% gray will be used as a reference for gray and the colours adjusted accordingly. This is why photos in a forest with no white or gray present in the scene will often end up with a deep green cast over your images.

    Auto White Balance Vs Presets

    There is no white or grey colour present in this shot, that is why auto white balance couldn’t adjust the colours properly. (notice that the sky is overexposed and camera can not consider it as white or grey colour

    What are White Balance Presets?

    Almost all digital cameras contain a variety of preset white balances; these presets are tuned to provide a fixed correction for common lighting scenarios. The camera relies on you to choose the right setting for the scene. The most popular presets are:

    Direct Sun

    Flash

    Shade

    Cloudy

    Tungsten

    Fluorescent

    The description and symbol for the above white balances are just rough estimates for the actual lighting they work best under. In fact, cloudy could be used in place of daylight depending on the time of day, elevation, or degree of haziness. In general, if your image appears too cool on your LCD screen preview (regardless of the setting), you can quickly increase the color temperature by selecting a setting further down on the list above. White Balance presets are not always accurate: for example the colour temperature for a shade area varies from summer to winter.

    Auto White Balance Vs Presets

    Auto White Balance vs Cloudy preset. (Notice that the preset did a better job)

    Auto White Balance Vs Presets

    Auto White Balance vs Fluorescent preset. The preset created a better colour

    Any tips on using White Balance presets properly?

    As a matter of fact in most cases the Auto White Balance does a better job than Presets, but if you are using a flash as your main source of light, then it is a good idea to set the White Balance to Flash and your camera will provide perfect colour.

    That is all for Part II of this discussion. In the next article we are going to explore the amazing possibilities with Custom White Balance.

    Did you know that Flash photography can be very creative? We scheduled our next Flash Photography workshop for beginners for October 29 and 31. This two part workshop has classroom sessions and practical experience with shooting with flash as main or fill light. Make plans to join us!


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    Understanding ISO

    Understanding ISO in Photography

    Part 1

     

    What is ISO

    ISO in photography terms is a measurement unit which measures the sensitivity of our media (film or digital sensor) to light. In simplest terms the higher the number the more sensitive the media is to light.

    We’ve seen that we can control the exposure through choices for Shutter Speed, Aperture and ISO. When it comes to low light situations, to maintain a certain shutter speed or to use a desired f-stop, we have to adjust the ISO.

    As a rule of thumb, photographers prefer to use the lowest possible ISO to keep the sharpness and dynamic range in their photos, but there are times when you want to capture a moving subject (such as sport photography or taking photos of kids) and there is no other choice than to use a higher ISO setting. After all a noisy (grainy) photo is far better than a blurry one!

    In this article I am going to show you some samples of different ISO and discuss some guidelines for choosing your ISO setting.

    Here are photos for comparison. I shot the first one at 100 ISO and the second one at 6400 ISO.

    Understanding ISO in photography

    ISO 100

     

    Understanding ISO in photography

    ISO 6400

    Understanding ISO in photography

    ISO 100 Vs 6400

    As you can see the lower ISO image is sharper, has better colour and more dynamic range in highlight and shadow.

    Here is a comparison at 100% view.

    Understanding ISO

    ISO 100 vs ISO 6400. Notice the noise and lack of sharpness in ISO 6400

    Generally speaking you want to stay with lowest ISO setting when you shoot landscape, portrait and detailed images such as macro photography. For moving subjects you should consider the lowest possible ISO. As an example if your subject is a bird in flight and you want to keep everything sharp and you are using a 300mm lens at f5.6, your minimum shutter speed should be 1/500s or faster. With your shutter speed set to 1/500s and your aperture at f5.6, check your camera’s light meter for exposure. If your camera cautions for under-exposure (usually there is some kind of warning that tells you the exposure is not correct), instead of reducing shutter speed (which results in a blurry photo) or opening up the f stop (which will give a shallow depth of field), increase the ISO till your camera’s built in meter stops asking for more light!

    There is much to learn about ISO and dynamic range which I will cover in future articles. For now, happy ISO shooting!

    We have scheduled a Digital Camera workshop for beginners for November 4 and 7. It is a two part workshop that covers the basic settings of a digital camera. Read more about this class and register now.


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    Creative Uses Of Aperture

    Creative uses of Aperture

    Part 2

    In last article I explained what Aperture is and how it works. In this article we are going to look at some creative uses of Aperture.

    Aperture not only controls the exposure, it also controls the Depth Of Field.

    What is Depth of Field?

    Let’s go to Wikipedia for a basic definition of Depth of Field (DOF):

    In optics, particularly as it relates to film and photography, depth of field (DOF), also called focus range or effective focus range, is the distance between the nearest and farthest objects in a scene that appear acceptably sharp in an image. Although a lens can precisely focus at only one distance at a time, the decrease in sharpness is gradual on each side of the focused distance, so that within the DOF, the unsharpness is imperceptible under normal viewing conditions.

    When considering depth of field the basic thing to remember is that the higher the f-stop number is, the more elements in the scene will be in focus.

    Creative uses of Aperture

    One of the Creative uses of Aperture is to control the Depth Of Field. In this image by using higher f stop , I have more elements in focus.

    Creative uses of Aperture

    Another Creative uses of Aperture is to make a shallow DOF to get the attention to the element of your choice.

    Creative uses of Aperture

    Shallow or Long Depth Of Field, that is the question

    What are the uses of DOF in photography?

    Depth of Field has many creative uses in photography. For instance when composing landscape pictures, you want to have as much in-focus elements to show the beauty of the scene:

    Creative uses of Aperture

    Long Depth of field to have more elements in focus

    On the other hand, in portrait photography you want your viewers to pay attention to your subject only, not the surrounding elements.

    Creative uses of Aperture

    Using lower F number for shallow DOF

    By controlling the DOF you can draw your viewer’s attention to a part of the image or the whole scene. Our brains like to look at sharp and focused images, so if there are elements in the photo which are out of focus, our brain does not usually notice them. See the example below:

    Creative uses of Aperture

    The effect of Aperture in photography

    On the right side of the image you notice the business card instantly, whereas on the left side of the photo the camera in the background compete for our attention.

    Another popular creative use of aperture is to use a high f-stop (narrow aperture) such as f16 or f22 which turns small light sources into a “Star Burst” effect:

    Creative uses of Aperture

    Selecting the f stop changes the small light sources in to Star Burst effect. Photo by Natalie Stephenson

    A discussion on creative uses of aperture wouldn’t be complete without looking at using a lower f-stop (wider opening) such as f1.8 or f2.8 to achieve small blurred circles of light patterns, commonly known as the Bokeh effect:

    Creative Uses of Apertute

    By using a lower f-stop (wider opening) such as f1.8 or f2.8 to achieve small blurred circles of light patterns, commonly known as the Bokeh effect:

     

    What is the Bokeh effect?

    Wikipedia defines Bokeh effect as:

    In photography, bokeh (Originally /?bo?k?/?bo?ke?/ boh-kay — also sometimes pronounced as /?bo?k?/ boh-k?) is the aesthetic quality of the blur produced in the out-of-focus parts of an image produced by a lens. Bokeh has been defined as “the way the lens renders out-of-focus points of light”. Differences in lens aberrations and aperture shape cause some lens designs to blur the image in a way that is pleasing to the eye, while others produce blurring that is unpleasant or distracting—”good” and “bad” bokeh, respectively. Photographers sometimes deliberately use a shallow focus technique to create images with prominent out-of-focus regions.

    Bokeh is often most visible around small background highlights, such as specular reflections and light sources, which is why it is often associated with such areas. However, bokeh is not limited to highlights; blur occurs in all out-of-focus regions of the image.

    Bokeh sample from Flickr

    Bokeh sample from Flickr

    Stay tuned for our next article where we’ll look at how to select a lens considering the Aperture.

    If you want to learn more about the creative uses of Aperture, check out our upcoming Digital Camera Bootcamp which starts on September 11. This eight week program covers many creative photography techniques and is for beginners to intermediate photographers who want to unleash their creativities.


    Ted and the Omnilargess Team

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