Posts Tagged 'Learn digital Camera Surrey BC'

Understanding the Histogram

Understanding the Histogram

Histogram can be your best friend in Digital Photography.

Do you use and refer to the Histogram in your digital camera or editing software such as Photoshop or Lightroom? Understanding the role of the Histogram in digital photography is very important and can help you make a perfect exposure.

Generally speaking, the Histogram shows you the tonality of light captured in an image. In this article, I am going to talk about the Luminosity Histogram, not the RGB Histogram. By understanding the information in the Histogram, you can easily modify the exposure to make a perfect shot.

Histogram

As you can see in the image above, the left side of the Histogram is pure Black, and the right side is pure White. The vertical axis shows the number of pixels. By studying the Histogram in this example, I know that most of the pixels are used for highlight areas with a few in Dark Grey and Black, resulting in overexposure like the image below.

Histogram in Over exposed photo

The Histogram in Overexposed photo

Or it can be a High Key image like this one.

By understanding the Histogram you can take better High key photos

By understanding the Histogram, you can take better High key photos

There is no such thing as a perfect Histogram. You should compare the Histogram with the scene and find out if your main subject is within the histogram range. For instance, try to understand how this Histogram would look like a photographic scene.

Histogram shows that the majority of pixels are in dark grey tones

The Histogram shows that the majority of pixels are in dark grey tones

Next, look at the image and compare it with the Histogram

Although majority of pixels are in dark grey tones, the Histogram tells you it is a correct exposure for this scene

Although the majority of pixels are in dark grey tones, the Histogram tells you it is a correct exposure for this scene

Now, look at this Histogram.

Histogram shows that the majority of pixels are in dark grey tones

In this image, the majority of pixels are in dark grey tones

Although it looks pretty similar to the previous Histogram, you understand that it is under-exposed when you compare it with the scene.

This Histogram shows you that the majority of pixels are in black and dark grey

This Histogram shows you that the majority of pixels are in black and dark grey.

Understanding Histogram is not tricky. It just takes practice to become familiar with the information it provides.

In our upcoming Photography BootcampI will cover this topic in-depth with more tips that you can put into action to learn one of the most powerful tools in digital photography. Understanding Histogram is like finding a best friend inside your digital camera – one which gives you instant and accurate feedback every single time!

Our next Bootcamp starts on February 3, 2022. It is a six-week program and has two field trips.

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Histogram

That is all for now. Stay tuned for my next photography Tips. We love to hear from you. Let us know if you have any questions; feel free to send us your questions, and we will be more than happy to answer them. Follow us on Facebook, Instagram and Twitter for more Free Tutorials and Tips.

Ted and the Omnilargess Team

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Focal Point part 2

Exploring ways to create Focal Point in your picture

In Part 1 we defined focal point and discussed why it is a key ingredient for dynamic eye-catching images. In Part 2 let’s jump right in and take a look at some ways to incorporate focal point for more compelling images.

Isolation

One of the best way to create visual focal points is to isolate your subject. The rain drop in this picture is a great example.

focal points

By using Depth Of Field, you can isolate the main subject from the rest of the scene to have a focal point.

I could have included other rain drops or background elements, but I chose to keep it simple. Nothing else in the image is taking your attention away from the rain drop. It’s completely uncluttered.

It also really helps when your subject is a different colour than the background. In this photo the main subject is completely obvious since its colour is totally different from the background.

Focal point

Differences in colour and contrast can be used to isolate the main subject

Certain backgrounds are easier to work with. A blue sky is a definite go-to for creating focal point because it is a single colour and nothing else.

Focal point

Using sky as a simple background can draw more attention to subject

A dense bush might not be such a good choice because it’s a dark and complicated mix of colours. Whatever you are photographing will need to be very bright and colourful in order for it to stand out against such a background.

focal point

A sample of busy and cluttered background

That is all for now. Stay tuned for more tips as we continue this series on focal point.

Are you eager to learn more? Visit our UPCOMING CLASSES for the full lineup of photography workshops. In the Fall Outdoor Photography Class, a fully hands-on outdoor workshop, you will have plenty of opportunity to practice these tips and more!

Ted and the Omnilargess Team

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Digital Camera auto Focus

Understanding your digital camera’s Auto Focus system

Photo Tip 

Have you ever wondered why your camera doesn’t always focus on your subject? Or thought there was something wrong with the AutoFocus function of your camera?

Is there something wrong with my digital camera autofocus system?

In this article, we are going to look at Auto Focus features for new digital cameras. There are several options available for Auto Focus, and we cover most of them in our Digital Photography Bootcamp classes. Still, for this article, I discuss two different settings that can affect your digital camera’s autofocus performance.

In single Auto Focus mode you can select the focusing point

In single Auto Focus mode, you can select the focusing point.

Auto Focus Auto or Auto Focus Single

By default, almost all digital cameras are set to Auto Focus Auto.  This means your camera “sees” the scene and compares it to its memory bank (not the memory card, but the information manufacturers add to camera processors) and decides where to focus. That doesn’t seem good. So why do manufacturers set Auto Focus Auto as the default setting? Because they think their cameras are more intelligent than we are!

In Auto Focus Auto your camera may select any of these focusing points.

In Auto Focus Auto, your camera may select any of these focusing points.

How does Auto Focus Auto work?

In this mode, the camera has a wide focusing area and searches for items inside that area to find the main subject. Manufacturers make different data available to enable a camera to recognize possible main subjects; some examples are Face recognition, Contrast priority, Brightness priority, Distance, etc. It will select one object in the scene as the main subject for focusing; usually, it’s the closest, most contrasty and brightest item. If you want to take a photo of your child in a park and no one else in the scene, the camera will do a decent job. What if there are other children in the scene and your child is furthest away from the camera? Here comes room for focusing error: your camera does not know your child, so it focuses on the nearest kid with a brighter T-shirt!

What is Auto Focus Single?

Autofocus Single is the setting I recommend in our photography classes, as cameras don’t have the brains or talent to recognize photographers’ focal points. In Autofocus Single, your camera still focuses automatically, but you control where it should focus. Autofocus single allows your camera to focus faster (it’s not searching for data) and more accurately (it’s using your choice of subject).

How does Auto Focus Single work?

It is straightforward. You select the focusing point, and your camera will focus on this point regardless of brightness, contrast, or even face recognition system. So you are in full control!

That is all for now. Every Monday, I post a new PHOTO CLUE. Stay tuned for my next photography Tips. We love to hear from you. Let us know if you have any questions; feel free to send us your questions, and we will be more than happy to answer them.

Follow us on Facebook, Instagram and Twitter for more Free Tutorials and Tips.

Ted and the Omnilargess Team

Ted and the Omnilargess Team

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Manual Exposure

Manual Exposure puts you in the driver’s seat

It’s all about getting perfect shots!

Photo Tip Friday October 10, 2015

Happy Thanksgiving everyone!

I want to start off by saying I am thankful for having such good audiences. Without your enthusiastic desire to learn and grow I couldn’t have made it this far.

For this week’s photo tip I want to discuss why you should take your photography experience to the next level by learning to shoot in manual exposure. In my photography workshops I always ask my students to gradually start shooting manual exposure and not to jump headlong into it. In this article I am going to explain the reason for emphasizing “gradually”!

In Manual Exposure you have more freedom for composition

In Manual Exposure you have more freedom for composition

Let’s take a look at some highlights of the different shooting modes:

Aperture priority A/AV

In this mode you set the aperture and your camera selects the shutter speed to make the correct exposure. It is very important to understand the metering system your camera uses to achieve the correct exposure; for example, shooting conditions where it shines and also where it sometimes fails.

When shooting Manual Exposure, You can select the depth of field by adjusting the Aperture.

When shooting Manual Exposure, You can select the depth of field by adjusting the Aperture.

Shutter priority S/TV

With this setting you select the shutter speed and the camera sets your aperture or f-stop. Same as with Aperture priority you should carefully select the metering mode best suited to your subject and conditions.

It was a windy day and while shooting Manual Exposure, I set my shutter speed higher to avoid the shake of the leaf.

It was a windy day and while shooting Manual Exposure, I set my shutter speed higher to avoid the shake of the leaf.

Manual Exposure

When you shoot in Manual Exposure you control both shutter speed and aperture. At first it seems very complicated but with practice you will get faster and more comfortable shooting in Manual. When you shoot in Manual exposure you refer to the camera’s built in Light meter to determine correct exposure and adjust the shutter speed and aperture as necessary. Once you’ve determined the correct settings you can walk around the scene and capture your pictures without being worried about the exposure provided the light stays the same. It is peace of mind which allows you to focus more on the composition.

When shooting in Manual Exposure you can set the exposure and take photos till the light changes.

When shooting in Manual Exposure you can set the exposure and take photos till the light changes.

Learning how to shoot in manual mode takes patience and practice before it becomes second nature; I strongly encourage you to experiment with shooting in manual with non-critical images where learning and experimentation are the goal.  Have fun with it and before long I’m sure you will be like many photographers who prefer to always shoot in manual exposure mode!

Do you want to learn more about how to shoot in Manual Exposure?

On November 22, 2014, I am leading a workshop about shooting in Manual Exposure. It is going to be very interesting and a great learning experience. This fully hands-on workshop is for everyone who wants to take better pictures and unleash the true power of their camera.

Ted and the Omnilargess Team


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Outdoor Photography Class Fall Colour

Outdoor Photography Class Fall Colour Edition

Two part workshop for capturing better photos 

Autumn is almost here with exciting opportunities to photograph the colourful images of fall. Fall is my favourite season because of the light, the vibrant colours and being out in the fresh outdoor air. Taking photos outdoors, especially in autumn, needs specific know-how techniques. Our Outdoor Photography Class is scheduled for October 5 and all camera makes and models are welcome.

This is a two part class; the first part is a three hour classroom session where you will learn how to control the settings on your camera, how to meter or read the light, how to compose your photos, etc. With outdoor photography you need to understand and change the camera settings on the fly. In outdoor photography the light can change so quickly, or your subject may move, so you need to be able to compensate for these changes as quickly as possible. The main part of Outdoor Photography Class is dedicated to finding and changing these settings in your digital camera quickly without wasting any time. Here is an example of how fast the ambient light can change.

In Outdoor Photography the ambient light can change quickly. In our Outdoor Photography class you learn how to change the camera settings fast

In Outdoor Photography the ambient light can change quickly. In our Outdoor Photography class you learn how to change the camera settings fast

I took these photos about 5 minutes apart; although my exposure is correct in both photos, you can see how the overall effect of light has changed from one image to the other.

Another important topic we are going to cover in the Outdoor Photography Class is composition, and how to find the right angle. I took these photos from different heights and angles.

Finding Guide lines is part of Outdoor Photography Class

Finding Guide lines is part of Outdoor Photography Class

Learn how to compose for dramatic outdoor photos

Learn how to compose for dramatic outdoor photos

In outdoor photography class you learn how and why you should change the angle of camera.

In outdoor photography class you learn how and why you should change the angle of camera.

The second part of the Outdoor Photography Class is completely hands on. We are going to walk around the field and apply these techniques in practical ways. It is a full three hour outdoor photography adventure with plenty of time to interact with your instructor and learn specific photography tips.

Exposure and composition are main topics in Outdoor photography class

Exposure and composition are main topics in Outdoor photography class

Come to outdoor photography class and learn how to the exposure for capturing outstanding Fall colours

Come to outdoor photography class and learn how to the exposure for capturing outstanding Fall colours

There are a few more tickets available for the Outdoor Photography Class. Register now to reserve your spot. As always, please contact us if you have any questions.

Ted and the Omnilargess Team

 

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Digital Camera Classes Fraser Valley

Digital camera classes Fraser Valley

Do digital camera classes really help you take better pictures?

This is a very good question. Regardless of the type of digital camera you have, in my experience the answer is: Yes, it is always very helpful to take our digital camera classes. We offer a wide variety of workshops for digital photography from camera settings for beginners to the most advanced tweaking and operating features for pro photographers and for all camera brands and models.

Digital Camera Bootcamp for beginners is one of our most successful workshops for the past two years. I receive many emails with feedback from our Bootcamp students and I post them on our blog and add them to our Testimonial page as well. Please take a moment and check these testimonials for yourself.

Our last digital camera Bootcamp wrapped up on August 15 and as always students were so nice to send me their feedback. I really appreciate the time and thoughtfulness of these testimonies and want to thank everyone for sending their comments and suggestions.

Omnilargess Digital Camera Classes help you to find your creativity in Photography

Omnilargess Digital Camera Classes help you to find your creativity in Photography

Omnilargess Digital Camera Classes are developed around the needs of photographers of all levels to keep pace with the ever-evolving technology of digital cameras and editing software like Photoshop and Lightroom. We make sure our students get the latest information in our classes and we are proud of the services we provide to our photography community in Vancouver and the Fraser Valley.

 

Here is James Orr’s testimony for our last Digital Camera Bootcamp and he was very kind to send some images to share with you.

 

“Hi Ted!  Thank you so much for putting on such a great class, Digital Bootcamp!  Prior to the class I had only used a point and shoot camera for work but with your instruction I have been able to take some really good photos with my DSLR.  Your instruction was to the point, useful and informative.  I have attached a few of my favorite photos taken while attending class.

 

Thanks again and look forward to taking the “manual settings class” if it fits my schedule.”

 

 

In Digital camera classes you learn how to control the Shutter speed

In Digital camera classes you learn how to control the Shutter speed

Night Scene photography is one of our most popular Digital Camera classes

Night Scene photography is one of our most popular Digital Camera classes

 

Slow shutter night time photography part of our Digital Camera Bootcamp

Slow shutter night time photography part of our Digital Camera Bootcamp

Panning is part of the Digital Camera Bootcamp.

Panning is part of the Digital Camera Bootcamp.

 

I want to thank all of you for supporting us and I look forward to seeing you in our workshops. Check our next Digital Camera Bootcamp and register now as we keep the class size small for your maximum learning benefit.

Ted and the Omnilargess Team


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Digital Camera Autofocus Modes

Digital Camera Autofocus Modes

 

Understanding Autofocus Modes in Digital Cameras

Photo Tip Friday August 15, 2014

Did you know that your digital camera has different Autofocus modes?

Do you know how to select the correct autofocus mode for the best results?

Almost all new digital cameras have very sophisticated autofocus system, but you don’t need to know all the technical specifications to benefit from this advanced technology. All you need to know is which the best autofocus mode for your application is.

 

Digital Camera Auto-Autofocus mode

Digital Camera Auto-Autofocus mode

Choosing correct autofocus mode is very important and unfortunately many photographers do not pay enough attention to autofocus modes and its potentials in their photography. This is why I added Selecting Correct Autofocus Mode as part of our new Digital Camera Bootcamp and I dedicated a 30 minute classroom session to this topic (with lots of practical hands-on in our field trips). In this article I’ll discuss the three major autofocus modes which almost all digital cameras are equipped with.

 

Introduction to Digital Camera Autofocus Modes 

These three modes are present in all digital cameras from an entry level all the way to pro level cameras. By understanding the capability of each setting, your photography experience will be smoother and the results will improve more.

Auto Autofocus

This is the default setting of camera. In this mode you allow the camera to pick the focusing points. When you select Auto Autofocus the camera selects the closest and brightest part of the scene or the closest face to focus on, which may not be exactly the point that you want to focus on.

Digital camera Auto-autofocus mode dose not know where to focus!

Digital camera Auto-autofocus mode dose not know where to focus!

 

Single Autofocus

You select the focusing point and force the camera to focus on that point. It is advised to use this mode, lock the focusing by pressing the shutter button half way down and then recompose. If you use spot metering the camera will read the exposure from where the focusing point is. Make sure to lock the exposure as well if you shoot using spot metering. This Autofocus Mode is recommended for still subjects.

 

Digital camera single auto focus mode allows you to select the focusing point

Digital camera single auto focus mode allows you to select the focusing point

Some digital cameras have more auto focus points

Some digital cameras have more auto focus points

Continuous Autofocus 

If you have a moving subject and want to keep the subject in focus, you should use Continuous Autofocus Mode. For instance you want to take photos of your pet running around in the park. The new digital cameras sense the movement and predict the direction of movement, then keeps focusing on your subject. The Continuous Autofocus Mode is suggested for moving subject. You press the shutter button half way down to activate the autofocus and keep pressing it down; when your subject starts to move the camera will change the focusing to keep the subject in focus. Most cameras are equipped with a back autofocus button. For best results I recommend using this button to activate autofocus and keep camera focusing on your subject.

Digital camera continuos auto focus allows you to select your moving subject and love the focusing.

Digital camera continuos auto focus allows you to select your moving subject and love the focusing.

That’s our Friday Photo Tip for this week!  For more in-depth information about using Autofocus systems in different cameras register for our upcoming Digital Camera Bootcamp for Beginners.

 

 


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Digital Photography Workshop

Composition in Outdoor Photography

Digital Photography workshop on October 4,

As we all know photography consists of Techniques and Art. Exposure, White Balance, Metering Mode, Etc. are the Technical part of photography. Although they are very important, don’t forget the Artistic part which is Composition.

What is Composition in Photography?

In Photography, Composition is the artistic part of photography. Here is a short description about Composition” “In the visual arts – in particular painting, graphic design, photography and sculpture – composition is the placement or arrangement of visual elements or ingredients in a work of art or a photograph, as distinct from the subject of a work. It can also be thought of as the organization of the elements of art according to the principles of art. The term composition means ‘putting together,’ and can apply to any work of art, from music to writing to photography, that is arranged or put together using conscious thought. In the visual arts, composition is often used interchangeably with various terms such as design, form, visual ordering, or formal structure, depending on the context. In graphic design and desktop publishing, composition is commonly referred to as page layout.” Wikipedia

Why Composition is important?

In photography, altering the position of the camera can change the image so that the subject has fewer or more distractions with which to compete. This may be achieved by getting closer, moving laterally, tilting, panning, or moving the camera vertically.

Use Guide line to add more depth to your image

Use Guide line to add more depth to your image

Is there any rules for Composition in Photography?

There are several rules in photography and other visual arts. Learning these rules helps you to pay more attention to details which means better pictures. These rules are very simple but they have great effects on your images.

Correct Exposure and good composition are the main elements in photography

Correct Exposure and good composition are the main elements in photography

Join us on  October, 4 from 10:00am to 5:00pm for our Digital Photography Workshop. There will be a 3 hour classroom for learning the settings on your camera and 3 hour hands on field photography. We are going to be outdoor and learn how to apply the rules that we study and how they can change our photos from ordinary to outstanding.


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